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Your blocks can range from the very simple to the very complex, and they will still benefit from sashing.

Sashing is what goes between the blocks in a quilt. Like quilt blocks, sashing can be very simple or it can be as complex as your quilt blocks. And some quilts have no sashing at all.

In this series of articles, you will see a wide range of sashing ideas. Many of them are a part of quilts I have made. In some cases, the photos are old (as are the quilts) and discolored. If I had the quilts, I would take new pictures, but most of my quilts have been given away, and what I have are the old, discolored pictures and the great feeling that those quilts are in the hands of someone who is enjoying them!

Sashing as Simple Strips of Fabric

Your blocks can range from the very simple to the very complex, and they will still benefit from sashing.

Sashing is what goes between the blocks in a quilt. Like quilt blocks, sashing can be very simple or it can be as complex as your quilt blocks. And some quilts have no sashing at all.

In this series of articles, you will see a wide range of sashing ideas. Many of them are a part of quilts I have made. In some cases, the photos are old (as are the quilts) and discolored. If I had the quilts, I would take new pictures, but most of my quilts have been given away, and what I have are the old, discolored pictures and the great feeling that those quilts are in the hands of someone who is enjoying them!

Sashing with Cornerstones

Your blocks can range from the very simple to the very complex, and they will still benefit from sashing.

Sashing is what goes between the blocks in a quilt. Like quilt blocks, sashing can be very simple or it can be as complex as your quilt blocks. And some quilts have no sashing at all.

In this series of articles, you will see a wide range of sashing ideas. Many of them are a part of quilts I have made. In some cases, the photos are old (as are the quilts) and discolored. If I had the quilts, I would take new pictures, but most of my quilts have been given away, and what I have are the old, discolored pictures and the great feeling that those quilts are in the hands of someone who is enjoying them!

Sashing with Cornerstones

Your blocks can range from the very simple to the very complex, and they will still benefit from sashing.

Sashing is what goes between the blocks in a quilt. Like quilt blocks, sashing can be very simple or it can be as complex as your quilt blocks. And some quilts have no sashing at all.

In this series of articles, you will see a wide range of sashing ideas. Many of them are a part of quilts I have made. In some cases, the photos are old (as are the quilts) and discolored. If I had the quilts, I would take new pictures, but most of my quilts have been given away, and what I have are the old, discolored pictures and the great feeling that those quilts are in the hands of someone who is enjoying them!

Sashing with Stripes

In the late 1880s and early 1900s, quilters got creatively crazy and began using a variety of different fabric types. Where traditional patchwork quilters had been using cotton and wool for their patchwork, some of the more bold quilters began using fabric such as velvet and silk in their quilts.

The story of why this began is a varied as the quilt designs themselves. One story has it that quilters decided to expand their horizons and use a wider range of available fabrics. Another is that because of the shortage of fabrics, quilters began using any fabric available regardless of shape, color or texture. True to the tradition of cotton patchwork, old worn out clothing was used, in addition to curtains, upholstery and other bits and pieces of available cloth.

Due to the variety of shapes of fabric, crazy quilts took on a look that was unique to each quilt. And because of the difficulty of patchwork piecing these irregular shapes, the pieces of cloth were sewn onto a foundation piece, typically muslin.

Crazy quilts were probably the beginning of the paper foundation piecing that has become popular today.

Your blocks can range from the very simple to the very complex, and they will still benefit from sashing.

Sashing is what goes between the blocks in a quilt. Like quilt blocks, sashing can be very simple or it can be as complex as your quilt blocks. And some quilts have no sashing at all.

In this series of articles, you will see a wide range of sashing ideas. Many of them are a part of quilts I have made. In some cases, the photos are old (as are the quilts) and discolored. If I had the quilts, I would take new pictures, but most of my quilts have been given away, and what I have are the old, discolored pictures and the great feeling that those quilts are in the hands of someone who is enjoying them!

Faux Pieced Sashing

A quilter in a discussion group asked what to do with small pieces of batting, and she expressed concern about wasting batting when her quilt was smaller than the batting, and she had pieces of batting left over.

This happens to every one of us. I used to have a big bag of leftover pieces. Like food, I was reluctant to throw leftover batting out, even though I had no idea what to do with it.

Then one day I read a tip from a quilter about how to sew small pieces of batting together to make one bigger piece. It's almost like a patchwork quilt inside your patchwork quilt!

Since that day, I always purchase queen or king size batting, cut pieces out of it the size I need, and then save the remaining pieces for future use. If I have a quilt that is somewhat small, I will sew the smaller pieces of batting together. For large quilts (i.e., queen or king), I still like to use one piece of batting. Handling a pieced batting can be kind of tricky. I piece the batting on top of the quilt backing just before I am ready to baste the quilt together. That way I am sure that the pieced batting won't get stretched or fall apart.

I’ll bet you thought buying a batt was the easiest part of quilting. Just when you thought you had it made, you are suddenly confronted with a dizzying array of choices. Yup, batts have gone high tech. Nowadays, picking out a batt can be a daunting experience.

 

The quilting guru Harriet Hargrave says, “No one batting is appropriate for every quilt.” Oh good, that narrows it down a little. She goes on to say that there are several factors to consider when deciding which batt to use. These factors include:

 

Okay, it’s three-digit, too-hot-to-breathe typical summer weather in Bakersfield, and as a paid-up member of the quilting sisterhood my thoughts naturally turn to flannel. Hey, can you blame me? Christmas is coming and I have quilts to make for presents. Besides, all of my family, on both my husband’s side and mine, live in the Rockies. Brrr. Flannel is the fabric of choice.

 

Flannel has taken over the quilting world. Half the fabrics in the shops seem to be flannel these days. Not just lumberjack shirt plaid and blue and pink bunnies either. The colors are glorious and the prints are in every style a quilter could dream of.

 

Making a quilt should be a fun and relaxing experience, so you should choose fabrics that you enjoy working with.

 

Keeping that in mind, there are a few tips that can make your quilt interesting and dynamic to look at.

 

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